Beryl the Brahman's miracle Bubba

Beryl the Brahman continues to thrive


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She miraculously survived the unprecedented north west monsoon, and now Beryl the Brahman has produced a little miracle of her own.

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Clancy Webster, 2, with Beryl the Brahman and bull calf Bubba.

Clancy Webster, 2, with Beryl the Brahman and bull calf Bubba.

SHE miraculously survived the unprecedented north west monsoon, and now Beryl the Brahman has produced a little miracle of her own.

The four-year-old heifer gave birth to her first calf Bubba just months after her family feared her lost to February's flood and the bitter cold conditions that ensued.

Raised as a poddy calf by owners Sally and Jake Webster, Beryl was caught up in the monsoon at Balootha, 100km north of Julia Creek.

With 90 per cent of their herd lost, the Webster's feared Beryl would also be a causality, but fortunately found her out in a paddock and led her to safety before the cold could claim her.

Mrs Webster said Beryl had been joined and preg tested in calf before the flood and they assumed she would have lost the calf during her ordeal.

But thankfully, Beryl was still pregnant and getting closer to being a first time mum by the day.

However, the birth was anything but smooth sailing for the family, who like so many out west have endured so much.

"We knew she was close and we were checking her two or three times a day," Mrs Webster said.

Bubba the Brahman with his human Clancy Webster.

Bubba the Brahman with his human Clancy Webster.

"She normally waits up near the house, but one morning she was not there and Jake went to find her.

"A few of us went out and eventually found her on her side, with legs out and we could tell she'd been there a while."

Mrs Webster said they tried to assist Beryl, but didn't want to harm her so they called friend and vet Vanessa Slack-Smith, who lives two hours away.

"We had to walk her to the yard, about three kilometres and it was quite slow, she was in so much pain, but she leads well, it's lucky we taught her which is helpful if she's ever in trouble.

Mrs Webster said Ms Slack-Smith arrived and gave Beryl a drug to make her uterus relax, before rearranging the calf to try to aid its birth.

"Eventually her and Jake could get it out, we thought it was dead, it literally flopped out and fell to the ground, but after a couple of seconds it blinked.

"Beryl was sitting at that stage and we got the calf to her to clean and mother it."

Despite the traumatic birth on July 25, the bull calf, which the Webster's two-year-old son Clancy has named 'Bubba' is doing well.

"He's a huge calf and looks really nice," Mrs Webster said.

"He'll just be raised around our house and become another life long pet, like Beryl."

Bubba is proof that life goes on in a region struggling to get back on its feet.

Mrs Webster said they were slowly getting back on track and had cattle on the property again, but the region was hanging out for storms.

"Now it's getting toward the end of the year, we are hoping for early storms as the grass is going to run out quickly.

"We are luckier than some in that we had a bit at the start of the year, but we are hoping for early storms, that's for sure."

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