Veresdale Scrub farmer raises a glass for World Milk Day

Veresdale farmer raises a glass for World Milk Day


Dairy
WORLD MILK DAY: Veresdale Scrub dairy farmer Rodney Teese with fresh milk.

WORLD MILK DAY: Veresdale Scrub dairy farmer Rodney Teese with fresh milk.

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Rodney Teese describes the high and lows of the industry and the milk process.

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SCENIC Rim milk lovers are urged to show their appreciation of dairy on World Milk Day, with one farmer raising his glass in support of the industry he is passionate about.

Veresdale Scrub dairy farmer Rodney Teese will be one of many people across the world who will celebrate the event to recognise dairy’s contribution to health, nutrition and the economic wellbeing of regional communities.

Social media users are encouraged to post a photo of a milk pour online, with the hashtags #worldmilkday and #milkpour.

Mr Teese said in the midst of uncertainty in the dairy industry, any chance to shine a light onto the highs and lows of being a dairy farmer  in Queensland was welcome.

“I want to spread the message across to people that fresh milk is here to be drunk and to be enjoyed,” he said.

“My opinion is that in 10 years time fresh milk might not exist.

“With the dairy industry dwindling in numbers, the only thing that might be available will be ultra high temperature and to me that is a big concern.”

Mr Teese said drinking long life milk could very well be the only option in the future in Australia, which is reality in some European countries.

“Every year there are more and more trucks coming from northern Victoria into Queensland because there is a shortage of milk – dairy farms closing down and the increase in population,” he said.

“If people continue to buy $1/litre milk, it will continue to put pressure on our farm gate prices, we’ll be at a price that is lower than production.”

Mr Teese said despite the rough times in the industry, he enjoyed being in the dairy industry.

“We milk 130 cows twice a day, we use over 11 machines, and it goes into a tank before the milk taker comes every night,” he said.

“Then the milk heads off to Brisbane where it is processed and gets put it on store shelves the next day.”

Mr Teese said work never stopped on the farm, irrigating pasture for crops, milling grain, feeding cows and repair and maintenance in between milking sessions.

“There’s always something happening and it’s great,” he said.

“It’s a livelihood that I was brought up with as a kid and now my kids are experiencing the same thing,” he said.

“I’m a fourth generation dairy farmer and I enjoy breeding cows, feeding cows and supplying a good product to consumers that is healthy.”

Rodney Teese having a drink with the calves on the farm.

Rodney Teese having a drink with the calves on the farm.

The story Veresdale Scrub farmer raises a glass for World Milk Day first appeared on Queensland Country Life.

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