North Queensland Register

The farm of the future is here

INFORMED: Delegates to the National Carbon Farming Conference & Expo will hear about the benefits of carbon farming from a range of experts, including farmers.

This article is branded content for Carbon Farmers of Australia.

The upcoming National Carbon Farming Conference & Expo - to be held in Albury from May 23 to 26 - will showcase the ways farmers are being rewarded right now in the carbon and biodiversity markets.

Louisa Kiely, Director of Carbon Farmers of Australia - which is the host of the conference - said extra income aside, there are plenty of co-benefits to carbon farming.

She said these included better soil structure and fertility; less erosion and soil loss; less soil salinity, healthier vegetation and animals; more biodiversity; buffering against drought; and greater water efficiency.

"Carbon farming is simply farming in a way that reduces emissions and/or captures and holds carbon in vegetation and soils," she said.

"It is managing land, water, plants, and animals to meet the triple challenge of landscape restoration, climate change and food security.

"Farmers reduce emissions in their production processes while increasing production and sequestering carbon in the landscape.

"It's the farm of the future, and it's already here."

HEALTHIER STOCK: Carbon farming is about managing land, water, plants, and animals to meet the triple challenge of landscape restoration, climate change and food security.

Ms Kiely encourages farmers and landholders to attend the National Carbon Farming Conference & Expo to get the information they need to make decisions around the carbon market and their farm.

"This is the tenth conference we've hosted, and it's so much more than just a conference," she said. "It is a full education."

Partner in the conference is AgriProve, which sold the first soil carbon credits in Australia.

"We have speakers from the Carbon Market Institute, Southern Cross University, CSIRO, NSW DPI, Regrow, Precision Pastures, Climate Friendly and so many more," Ms Kiely said.

"We will also hear from farmers about their perspective and what they are doing on their own land.

"The best way to get farmers to take action is to pay them for doing so."

Ms Kiely said we are entering a new era of farmers being paid fairly for the ecosystem changes they are making, and the conference is the best place to learn about that.

EXPERTS: Louisa Kiely and Helen McCosker, farmer and founder of Carbon 8

She said more than 30 exhibitors - many of the speakers included - will be available throughout the conference to meet face-to-face and discuss their products, systems and answer farmers' questions.

"This is one of the key opportunities," she said. "You go to the sessions and out into the expo and ask all the curly questions then and there."

The conference begins with a 'Carbon Farming 101' workshop, which is suitable for anyone new to carbon farming.

Then there are two days of in-depth sessions and exhibitors and, to finish, there is an advanced workshop where farmers can learn how to take part in a project, implementation and aggregation opportunities.

NRM and other groups, as well as farmers, are encouraged to attend.

A welcome event, happy hour and gala dinner give lots of opportunities for networking and speaking to farmers who have implemented projects of their own.

"This year we are also offering virtual seats for those who can't attend in person," Ms Kiely said. "This is the first time this option is available."

With the program live and being updated as spots were finalised, Ms Kiely said that people should visit the website to see everything the conference will cover.

"Registration is open - and seats are filling up, so I urge you to get in quick," she said.

The full program is available here.

This article is branded content for Carbon Farmers of Australia.