Improving flood resilience in the Burdekin and Haughton

Burdekin and Haughton Flood Resilience Strategy released

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Emergency Management Minister David Littleproud says "we'll never be able to eradicate disasters, but we can always ensure we are better prepared for when they strike".

Emergency Management Minister David Littleproud says "we'll never be able to eradicate disasters, but we can always ensure we are better prepared for when they strike".

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The importance of working together as one when preparing for and responding to floods has been highlighted in the Burdekin and Haughton Flood Resilience Strategy.

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The importance of working together as one when preparing for and responding to floods has been highlighted in the Burdekin and Haughton Flood Resilience Strategy.

Released last week, the strategy takes a community-led approach to reducing flood risks, sharing knowledge and building resilience in the regions.

Charters Towers Regional Council Mayor Frank Beveridge said local governments were "the one's at the coalface" when it came to flooding events.

"They've [Queensland Reconstruction Authority] been talking to farmers, business people and local government representatives to get on-the-ground knowledge and we welcome any consultation to assist in the decision making process," Cr Beveridge said.

"We dislike nothing more than hearing about a regional plan that we weren't consulted about so when we're given the opportunity, we appreciate it."

Eight councils were involved in the development of the strategy and Cr Beveridge said it was interesting to hear from people outside of his immediate area.

"One of the interesting aspects of the process was getting speak with people who were a little bit further afield, hearing their experiences and comparing them with our own," he said.

"I'm a great believer in giving people the tools to do it themselves.

"Unfortunately in city councils we often see people throw their hands in the air and expect government to save them. In the regional areas people tend to take a lot more responsibility for their own situations."

The strategy was commissioned after the 2019 North and Far North Queensland monsoon trough and was funded through the joint Commonwealth-State Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements $242 million Category C and D package.

It was developed by the Queensland Reconstruction Authority in partnership with the Barcaldine, Burdekin, Charters Towers, Isaac, Mackay, Tablelands, Townsville and Whitsunday councils, who will oversee the implementation of the strategy.

Burdekin Shire Council Mayor Lyn McLaughlin said consultation for the strategy was extensive and involved a lot of local knowledge being provided to the Queensland Reconstruction Authority.

"The Burdekin and Haughton Flood Resilience Strategy is testament to what can be achieved when local governments collaborate, and is groundbreaking as it is a strategy encompassing the largest river catchment in Queensland," she said.

Deputy Premier and State Development, Infrastructure, Local Government and Planning Minister Steven Miles said it was crucial to work together to improve the resilience of communities across Queensland.

Emergency Management Minister David Littleproud said the strategy would increase community capacity in the face of major flood events.

"The Burdekin and Haughton catchments are home to approximately 110,000 people across almost 39,000 properties, stretching from Alpha in the south all the way up the Atherton Tablelands in the north," Mr Littleproud said.

"This strategy is about being prepared and an excellent example of cooperation between the Australian and Queensland governments.

"We'll never be able to eradicate disasters, but we can always ensure we are better prepared for when they strike."

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