Lamb's first drink is critical to its early development

Lamb's first drink is critical to its early development

Sheep
Aa

Bianca Agenbag has won a science award for her efforts to learn more about the early development of lambs by focussing on colostrum.

Aa
Bianca Agenbag's project aims to fill a significant knowledge gap in the early development of lambs by focussing on colostrum. Picture: supplied.

Bianca Agenbag's project aims to fill a significant knowledge gap in the early development of lambs by focussing on colostrum. Picture: supplied.

Bianca Agenbag has won a science award for her efforts to learn more about the early development of lambs by focussing on colostrum.

The University of Adelaide researcher was the 2021 recipient of a wool industry award at the "Science and Innovation Awards for Young People in Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry".

The nationwide awards are held by the Agriculture, Water and Environment Department and are open to young Australians aged between 18-35 who deliver scientific research for the benefit of agriculture.

Bianca's project aims to fill a significant knowledge gap in the early development of lambs by focussing on colostrum.

"Colostrum contains all of the essential antibodies needed for the lamb to start its digestive system and gastrointestinal tract," Ms Agenbag said.

"Lambs are born with absolutely no antibodies of their own, so having that first drink is absolutely crucial.

"Up until now there has little research done in this area for sheep.

"I really love closing the gap between industry and research. I'm really passionate about following through the research and then making it available and easily understandable and adaptable to farmers."

Australian Wool Innovation chief executive Stuart McCullough said AWI was a partner of the award.

"Improving lamb survival is a key part of the wool industry's focus on sheep welfare," Mr McCullough said.

"It also drives recovery of the size of the national Merino flock.

"AWI has a great interest in reproduction and nutrition research and development and we feed the findings into our grower training program Lifetime Ewe Management which drives up lamb and ewe survival". "

Results from LTEM are becoming important measures of the wool industry's sustainability as well.

Ten other young researchers received awards covering different fields of agriculture.

Each of this year's recipients have been awarded funding to undertake their project over a 12-month period.

Start the day with all the big news in agriculture! Sign up below to receive our daily Farmonline newsletter.

The story Lamb's first drink is critical to its early development first appeared on Farm Online.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by