How saleyards adapted to coronavirus restrictions in 2020

Coronavirus restrictions challenging but kept saleyards open in 2020

Coronavirus
Aa

Queensland livestock agents were more than satisfied with the federal government's tighter social distancing protocols in saleyards in order to allow the industry to continue operating in 2020.

Aa
Like many businesses, saleyards around the country had to enforce protocols to limit the spread of coronavirus, with everyone involved adapting quickly in order to keep the industry going.

Like many businesses, saleyards around the country had to enforce protocols to limit the spread of coronavirus, with everyone involved adapting quickly in order to keep the industry going.

Queensland livestock agents were more than satisfied with the federal government's tighter social distancing protocols in saleyards in order to allow the industry to continue operating in 2020.

"The Australian Livestock and Property Agents Association worked closely with governments and the broader industry to develop appropriate protocols to ensure the continuation of saleyard selling, as they are public places and COVID had the potential to be exposed," TopX Australia owner and agent Cyril Close said.

"During this intense consultation, from the beginning it has been comforting to see the system stay alive and well as saleyards in all shapes and forms provide so much to their local communities.

"Saleyards are a point of catch-up for a lot of the rural community and it was difficult for many to adjust and not being able to come along for the social interaction and market participation."

But this sacrifice allowed sales to continue, therefore allowing all industry related positions of employment to stay viable, Mr Close said.

"This in turn had given clients and buyers options with the marketing and buying of livestock to keep our industry running against all other trends," he said.

"At the Roma Saleyards we encouraged the vendors to stay away and enforced the 'one post, one buyer', as the posts are positioned further apart than the 1.5 metre requirement."

GDL managing director Peter Daniel said he found the protocols worked very well.

"It was essential we adhered to rules set down by the government so we could continue to operate saleyards," Mr Daniel said.

"Initially some of the general public and potential buyers found the rules were harsh when they were introduced, but each week it got easier and everyone got used to the restrictions."

Nutrien Ag Solutions western Queensland and north-west NSW general manager Damon Ferguson said the saleyards were faced with the COVID problem overnight and everyone involved adapted very quickly, which was commendable.

The story How saleyards adapted to coronavirus restrictions in 2020 first appeared on Queensland Country Life.

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by