Despite rain, drought 'still real' for many across nation

Voice of Real Australia: Despite rain, drought 'still real' for many across nation

REAL AUSTRALIA
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It can take months for rain to translate into money, and that doesn't cancel out the years of lost income.

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Rural Aid delivers hay to farmers at Killarney, Qld.

Rural Aid delivers hay to farmers at Killarney, Qld.

There are parts of Australia where the rain has fallen so regularly, that it can be easy for drought to slip our minds.

The news cycle has been spinning faster than ever thanks to other big national and global stories including the bushfires and, of course, the coronavirus pandemic.

And where it has rained, many are hailing it one of the best starts to the growing season in quite some time, with many farmers sowing crops for the first time in years.

The federal government has already moved on to planning for the "next" drought.

But, as many a farmer has told me - the drought doesn't end just because it rains.

It can take months for rain to translate into money, and that doesn't cancel out the years of lost income.

Then there are those still waiting for the rain.

Many of the pastoral areas in the north of SA and the far west of NSW and Qld had one or two falls that provided temporary relief, but nothing since.

And other areas, such as parts of the Eyre Peninsula, have not had the regular rain many others have received.

SA's rural financial counsellors say they are as "busy as they've ever been", helping not just farmers but small businesses impacted by drought.

Local SA Rotary clubs have partnered with the Helping SA Farmers group to organise a hay run to Yunta, SA, this weekend.

Local SA Rotary clubs have partnered with the Helping SA Farmers group to organise a hay run to Yunta, SA, this weekend.

For rural charity Rural Aid, they have also been busy, providing hay, bill support and other funds to people doing it tough even in recent weeks.

This is made even harder by the fact there had been little talk of drought in the past few months, which does impact revenue.

Rural Aid CEO John Warlters says Australians do want to help and they notice donations go up when there is coverage of the issue.

"There is still an absolute need and there will be for some time to come," he said.

For those in drought, you are not forgotten, and there is support available.

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