Bat committee disbanded in Charters Towers

Flying fox committee disbanded in Charters Towers

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A flying fox taskforce has been disbanded in Charters Towers.

A flying fox taskforce has been disbanded in Charters Towers.

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A committee established to resolve the flying fox issue in Charters Towers has been disbanded, despite bats continuing to plague the town.

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A COMMITTEE established to resolve the flying fox issue in Charters Towers has been disbanded, despite bats continuing to plague the town.

Charters Towers Regional Council resolved to disband and close the flying fox advisory committee at this month's general meeting.

It was established in February 2018 to provide council with recommendations to as to how to manage the negative impact of flying foxes in the region.

Members included representatives from the CSIRO, state government, Kennedy MP Bob Katter, Traeger MP Robbie Katter, community members and council.

Mayor Frank Beveridge said the committee had served its purpose and it was now time for action.

"We appreciate the years of work that has been invested by the various committee members, especially our community members and the input from various agencies.

"The purpose of the flying fox advisory committee was to bring together the various stakeholders to formulate a plan moving forward.

"The committee has now fulfilled that purpose and is no longer required. We have the plan and now is the time for action."

This comes after Cr Beveridge earlier this month demanded the Department of Environment and Science relocate a large colony at Lissner Park to an alternative site four kilometres out of town.

Cr Beveridge said little progress had been made rehabilitating the site and bats were supposed to be relocated in April 2020.

But a Department of Environment and Science spokeswoman, while acknowledging the delays, said progress was being made on the project.

A consultant has been engaged to move the roost on and the department is finalising arrangements so work to construct the alternative flying fox roost could start as soon as practicable.

Improvement works at the site will include earth works and turf, water supply, irrigation and a pond, fencing and lighting, which are designed to make the site appealing to flying foxes.

The state government allocated $900,000 for habitat works at an alternate roost site and flying fox dispersal at Lissner Park in 2018.

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