Retrofit no-till specialists get a shake-up

RFM Ag gets new management team

On Farm
TEAM WIN: Bruce Hutcheon will head up a new look team at RFM Ag, including general manager Heath Hutcheon, continuing to provide retrofit no-till sowing technology from Coolamon NSW.

TEAM WIN: Bruce Hutcheon will head up a new look team at RFM Ag, including general manager Heath Hutcheon, continuing to provide retrofit no-till sowing technology from Coolamon NSW.

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RFM Ag gear up for sowing

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Industry veteran Bruce Hutcheon will head up a new-look management team at the no-till retrofit technology company, RFM Ag.

Known as the founder and owner of Coolamon Chaser Bins, Mr Hutcheon is the former owner of Hutcheon Pearce and has over five decades of experience in the agricultural sector.

Mr Hutcheon will lead a team comprising Heath Hutcheon, general manager, John Russell, parts manager and sales, Emma Walsh, marketing manager and Melissa Hatty, financial manager.

Purchasing RFM Ag 12 years ago, following the demise of Ryan Farm Machinery, Mr Hutcheon said the business, based in Coolamon NSW, is dedicated to creating efficient equipment for no-till planting.

"We took the line of developing after market componentry in double disc, tynes, press wheels and press harrows for all brands of air seeders," he said.

"More recently, we have developed gauge wheels and closing wheels for planters in cotton and specialised crops."

Mr Hutcheon said the company's self-cleaning NT Series tyne has become synonymous with direct drill farming and is renowned for its heavy duty features and ability to fit most frames.

"We now run a bush in the pivot for better wear and longer life, and it has the ability to fit a single or two bolt shank or a double disc," he said.

Mr Hutcheon said the company's double disc design incorporataed a 15 degree angle allowing it to cut through the toughest of stubbles.

"The double disc has adapters to suit other machinery brands as well as our own," he said.

Mr Hutcheon said operators could quickly swap from tyne to disc for deep planting urea or sowing canola in dry conditions, making the planting program more versatile.

In northern systems, Mr Hutcheon said the RFM spring coil press wheels were proving popular.

"The coil press wheel will contact the soil to the seed, it doesn't smear the soil so germination is not impeded by crusting, and there is no mud build-up on the metal press wheel, allowing growers to start sowing earlier."

The Press harrows offer the capabilities of a press wheel leveling harrow and a

coil press wheel in one product.

Mr Hutcheon said press harrows offered the capabilities of a press wheel levelling harrow and a coil press wheel in one product.

"All our coils are double connected in both sides for extra strength. The beauty of the press harrow is it can be used either in a straight line as a press wheel, or it can be angled for use as a press harrow to level ground for hay production," he said.

"It has a low maintenance bearing design and quick change angle and level position."

Mr Hutcheon said another piece of technology was RFM's coil closing and gauge wheel, which had been developed over the past five years to improve germination and minimise cracking issues when precision planting.

"Operators can start earlier than with a rubber wheel, the two closing wheels at the back bring the seed and soil together for better germination," he said.

"It helps avoid kinze cracking where the soil shrinks away from the seed in the furrow. These coils don't smear and will leave the soil friable."

Mr Hutcheon said a comparative gas trial on northern NSW black soils using the coil and closing wheel had resulted in no gas escaping from the coil row and less clods.

The story Retrofit no-till specialists get a shake-up first appeared on Farm Online.

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