Hope rises for 2020

Restocking the north west brings hope to communities

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Richmond graziers Beris and Corbett Tritton with children Felicity, 18, Natalie, 13, Isabella, 15, Adelaide, 17, and Elliott, 11, have started to restock.

Richmond graziers Beris and Corbett Tritton with children Felicity, 18, Natalie, 13, Isabella, 15, Adelaide, 17, and Elliott, 11, have started to restock.

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The devastating losses suffered during February's north west flood will be felt for years, but those who managed to quickly pick up the pieces are restoring hope to their communities.

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THE devastating losses suffered during February's north west flood will be felt for years, but those who managed to quickly pick up the pieces are restoring hope to their communities.

Richmond graziers Corbett and Beris Tritton, and their five children, were among hundreds of primary producers to lose cattle, infrastructure and assets during the disaster.

They lost 2300 head of cattle and tallied their losses at over $4 million.

However the Trittons saw no other option but to get back to business as quickly as possible.

They are among the 124 families who to have accessed a Restocking, Replanting and On-farm Infrastructure co-contribution grant to help replace the lost livestock and recover long-term.

So far $36.7 million has been paid out, with the scheme remaining open for affected producers until June 30, 2021 or until available funding is fully distributed.

Cattle is in the blood for Mr Tritton, who grew up on Silver Hills, north of Richmond. After time away, he returned to buy the property and now runs eight neighbouring properties bordering the Flinders River and a ninth block also in the north west.

"The monsoon event was pretty exceptional in that we were already in drought, so the cattle were already poor, especially the younger cattle," Mr Tritton said.

"We flew out here and started flinging hay to save what we could.

"We do droughts, we do floods, but we don't do this.

"When you endure the drought for so long and that kind of event happens, it's pretty hard on people because they're at the end of their tether already. In saying that they're a tough bunch and rallied behind each other."

Giving up was never an option for the Trittons, who used the grant funding to quickly restock cattle and restore cash flow.

"We had to buy the cattle regardless of any funding to exist and keep running, it's what we do here," Mr Tritton said.

He said support distributed to the north west showed help was available and the nation depended on graziers to move forward.

"They need to access the grant because Australia needs viable producers."

  • North Queensland Restocking, Replanting and On-Farm Infrastructure co-contribution grants of up to $400,000 are available for primary producers to restock, replant and repair after flooding. QRIDA administers North Queensland Restocking, Replanting and On-Farm Infrastructureco-contribution grants on behalf of the Australian Government.
  • For more information visit www.qrida.qld.gov.au or Freecall 1800 623 946.
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