Project to grow northern Australia mango exports to China

Project to grow northern Australia mango exports to China


Horticulture
Shifting from an airfreight transport model to one of sea freight, will be a key focus of the research.

Shifting from an airfreight transport model to one of sea freight, will be a key focus of the research.

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A project promising to boost northern Australian mango exports into China by 200 per cent within five years has been announced.

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A project promising to boost northern Australian mango exports into China by 200 per cent within five years has been announced today.

The $2.24 million Cooperative Research Centre for Developing Northern Australia research collaboration between Australia’s leading Calypso mango exporter Perfection Fresh (Perfection), the Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF) and the University of Queensland (UQ) will use the latest in supply chain management, quality assessment tools and information technology platforms to identify and resolve issues impeding the export of mangoes into China.

The CRCNA has committed $952,471 towards the project, with the remainder of the project funded via cash and in-kind contributions from project participants.

The project is expected to be completed by mid-2021.

Drawing on earlier research and investment from Perfection and DAF, the project will facilitate and monitor the adoption of improved supply chain systems, including innovative tracking, monitoring, communications and information technologies to identify and resolve issues across the entire supply chain, which may currently be limiting the volume of mangoes able to be exported to China.

Project participants will work with existing customers in China to test and assess the efficacy of new chain management and quality monitoring strategies, while Perfection’s Vapour Heat Treatment (VHT) facilities in Brisbane will be used to ensure required biosecurity protocols are met.

Perfection spokesperson Andrew Edwards said shifting from an airfreight transport model to one of sea freight, will be a key focus of the research.

“Transporting mangoes via sea freight will transform the industry from a low volume Australian export participant, more than tripling current export value to over $20 million per year, within the next three to five years,” he said.

CRCNA CEO Jed Matz said although the project’s initial focus is on the Calypso mango supply chain, it’s expected any improvements in the domestic supply chain management will be shared with the broader industry.

“The impact of this project will be across the northern Australian mango industry as opportunities to increase the volume of mango exports into China means less pressure on local prices in the longer term.”

Katherine Times

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