Vale soldier, saddler and farmer, Jock Chiverton

Skilled bushman, Jock Chiverton remembered

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Samuel (Jock) Chiverton had his right leg mutilated by Japanese gunfire on his 21st birthday but he survived to live out a productive and fruitful life.

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Jock Chiverton was born in Rockhampton on August 4, 1922, and passed away in Dalby on August 17, 2018. When life was tough he would remark - “Whinging won’t grow me a new leg”. Photo supplied.

Jock Chiverton was born in Rockhampton on August 4, 1922, and passed away in Dalby on August 17, 2018. When life was tough he would remark - “Whinging won’t grow me a new leg”. Photo supplied.

Samuel (Jock) Chiverton was born at Rockhampton on August 4, 1922.  He left school at 13 and secured employment on a dairy farm at Inglewood, earning ten shillings ($1) a week and his keep.

After 18 months there, he spent the next six years working on sheep and cattle properties in far western Queensland, sending money home to support his family.

Jock enlisted in the AIF on February 5, 1942 at the age of 19, a member of the 2nd Division of the 7th Battalion; Australian Infantry Brigade.

He saw active service in New Guinea and on his 21st ​birthday, in the battle of Salamaua, his battalion was ambushed by Japanese soldiers and Jock was shot in the right knee by a Japanese machine gun bullet, resulting in his right leg being amputated above the knee.

Evacuated to Greenslopes Hospital, Brisbane he was fitted with an artificial leg and discharged on August 19, 1944 with an army pension of thirty shillings a week. He held no animosity towards the Japanese, stating: “They were soldiers just like us.”

He learnt the trade of a saddler; purchased a Chevrolet truck and travelled to the Gulf country and far western Queensland working on cattle stations, counter-lining saddles and all types of leather work; when needed, he cooked for large numbers of stockman.

After operating a saddlery at Camooweal, he married Esme Hartman at Dalby, purchased a dairy farm at Monto and in 1960, purchased Brazil, a grain and cattle property in the Bowenville district.

Jock grazed Hereford cattle, grew lucerne and other grain crops, built silage pits for himself and other farmers in the district, and built sheds and fences.

He learnt the art of whip-making, and undertook contractor harvesting and grader work.

He erected windmills, continued his saddle work, developed a love of wood-turning, bred Kelpies, turkeys and pigs, cured and smoked hams and made wurst, brewed beer, made soap and kept bees for honey.

Esme, his wife of many years predeceased him and he is survived by his partner of 22 years, Marie Hanley, sons Frank, Don, Owen, Brian and daughter Gloria, 14 grandchildren and 27 great-grand children.

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