Premier stands firm on vegetation management laws

Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk responds to Rockhampton protest


Politics
Protesters surrounded Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk to make their voice heard about vegetation management laws in Rockhampton on Wednesday night. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

Protesters surrounded Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk to make their voice heard about vegetation management laws in Rockhampton on Wednesday night. Photo: Kelly Butterworth.

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Premier felt threatened and intimidated by some anti-vegetation management protesters.

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PREMIER Annastacia Palaszczuk will not back down on controversial vegetation management laws despite receiving a hostile reception from graziers in Rockhampton last night.

Ms Palaszczuk today slammed the actions of some protesters, saying she felt intimidated by their disrespectful behaviour.

“I firmly believe in democracy and I believe people have a right to protest,” Ms Palaszczuk said.

“Unfortunately there were a couple of people there that went a step too far, I don't believe that verbal abuse, swearing is acceptable.

“I was quite shocked by that, and I wouldn't expect that as part of a Queensland I live in. I think that was very disrespectful.”

Ms Palaszczuk defended her decision to not mention the land clearing laws in her address at the official welcome last night, saying she stood by the laws.

"These are laws that my government made a commitment to before the last election, there was no secret, these laws have been in place before the Newman Government for many many years,” she said.

Ms Palaszczuk indicated that any ongoing campaigns to fight the laws would be fruitless.

"These laws are in place, they were assented to by the governor yesterday,” she said.

“They are laws that passed through the parliament last week.”

Ms Palaszczuk said the laws were required to halt the level of land clearing in Queensland.

“Most farmers are doing the right thing, let me make that very clear, but what we have seen is some large scale land clearing happening across our state which are at levels which are not sustainable and contribute to climate change. 

“Once again I will say, everyone has a right to protest, but the swearing and some of the behaviour which I found personally threatening and intimidating, I don't believe is acceptable in the Queensland that we all live in. I believe in respect.”

Ms Palaszczuk said she believed there had been some miscommunication to the agriculture industry surrounding the laws.

“I think now Mr Furner and myself and the government are going to put out more communication because there is a bit of misinformation going out into the agricultural sector to graziers and I want to put that information on the public record for them to see.”

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