ACCC acts on quad rollovers

ACCC urges on quad bike riders to have a say

Local Business Feature
Side-by-side ATVs with ROPs are generally considered safer than traditional quad bikes when working on farms.

Side-by-side ATVs with ROPs are generally considered safer than traditional quad bikes when working on farms.

Aa

Quad bike users and manufacturers have until May 4 to have their say on proposed industry changes from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

Aa

Quad bike users and manufacturers have until May 4 to have their say on proposed industry changes from the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission.

The ACCC has proposed major changes to improve the safety of quad bikes, including the introduction of a safety rating system, crush protection devices and mandatory minimum performance standards.

Tragically, quad bike accidents result in an average of 16 deaths in Australia each year. They also result in about six people per day attending a hospital emergency department and two of these requiring hospitalisation for serious injuries.

Children are at greater risk of serious injury and death while operating quads. They should never operate adult-sized quad bikes. Even the smaller youth quads have been involved in fatal incidents in Australia.

To help reduce the deaths and injuries associated with quad bikes, the ACCC is proposing a mandatory safety standard that:

  • Adopts the US standard and requires an additional rollover warning label
  • Introduces a safety star rating system so safer vehicles get a higher rating
  • Requires manufacturers to integrate an operator protection device, such as a crush protection device or rollover protection device in the design of new quad bikes
  • Imposes minimum performance tests for dynamic handling, stability and mechanical suspension, and requires all wheels be able to rotate at different speeds.

“The ACCC believes a mandatory safety standard incorporating all of these elements is the best option to save lives and make quad bikes safer for everyone,” said ACCC commissioner Mick Keogh.

“The ACCC has considered a range of evidence and views in making this draft recommendation.

“We have consulted with industry representatives, quad bike manufacturers and retailers, farmers, consumers, academics, hospitals, health professionals, tourism operators, among many others.”

Following submissions, the ACCC will make a final recommendation to the government mid-year.

If you ride one of the 190,000 a quad bikes in Australia, the ACCC strongly recommends you follow safety advice.

  • Visit productsafety.gov.au
Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by