Northern Muster: Does your dog need rego?

Lay of the land for working dog breeders


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The new requirements only apply to dogs born on or after May 26, 2017. After this date, it is an offence to supply dogs without first registering as a breeder – unless you fit the description of a working dog breeder.

The new requirements only apply to dogs born on or after May 26, 2017. After this date, it is an offence to supply dogs without first registering as a breeder – unless you fit the description of a working dog breeder.

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The Queensland Dog Breeder Register is designed to encourage responsible dog breeding by helping authorities locate dog breeders and giving dog buyers peace of mind when sourcing a pup.

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Droving, protecting, tending and working stock. The value of a working dog is widely recognised.

They’re a primary producer’s indispensable workmate, which is why working dog breeders may be exempt from new dog breeder registration laws in Queensland.

The Queensland Dog Breeder Register opened earlier this year. It’s designed to encourage responsible dog breeding by helping authorities locate dog breeders and giving dog buyers peace of mind when sourcing a pup.

If you’re a primary producer breeding working dogs to be kept on rural land for droving, protecting, tending or working stock, or to supply to other primary producers to use as working dogs, you don’t need to register.

However, if your dog has an unplanned litter, you only breed puppies for family and friends, or any of your dogs are sold or given away as pets or to live in town, the new laws apply.

This means you must register, obtain a breeder identification number and microchip the dogs.

The new requirements only apply to dogs born on or after May 26, 2017. After this date, it is an offence to supply dogs without first registering as a breeder – unless you fit the description of a working dog breeder.

Registering is quick, easy and free. Breeders need to log their details within 28 days of their puppies being born and they will be issued with a unique identification number, known as a supply number. This applies to regular and occasional breeders (including backyard litters), with specific exceptions for some working dog producers.

Read the Northern Muster Spring/Summer 2017 edition in full by clicking here

If you’re a member of an industry organisation that accredits dog breeders, like Dogs Queensland, then your membership number may also be your supply number and you may not need to register. However, your organisation must first be approved by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries – check this with your member organisation.

Some local councils also issue dog breeder permits. If your local council has been approved by the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries and you have a council breeder permit, you may not need to register either as your permit number may double as your supply number. Check the Register for your number, or contact your local council to confirm.

Chief Biosecurity Officer Malcolm Letts from the Department of Agriculture and Fisheries said all breeders and suppliers, including pet shops, must display a supply number when giving away, selling or advertising dogs or puppies. It must also be included in the microchip information of the dog.

“A supply number being included in the microchip information provides lifetime traceability of a dog’s origin,” Mr Letts explained.

“We’re urging people to check the Queensland Dog Breeder Register before obtaining a new dog and to only buy from registered breeders with valid supply numbers.”

The Queensland Dog Breeder Register is available at qdbr.daf.qld.gov.au. For more information about the register or animal welfare in Queensland, please visit www.biosecurity.qld.gov.au or call 13 25 23.

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