Producers seek animal welfare accreditation

Pilot workshop delivers animal welfare accreditation

Rural Training Queensland trainer Jean Robins, second from right, talks about animal welfare requirements.

Rural Training Queensland trainer Jean Robins, second from right, talks about animal welfare requirements.

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A new pilot workshop has been developed to provide accreditation for producers in the area of animal welfare.

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Ongoing scrutiny of animal husbandry practices and the recognition of the need for a social license to operate in the beef cattle industry has resulted in an Animal Health and Welfare Accreditation workshop developed specifically for graziers.

Burdekin graziers were the first to take part in the pilot two-day workshop held at Tom and Karen Murphy’s Collinsville property, Tabletop, in early June. 

Funded by the Queensland Government’s Grazing BMP program and organised by NQ Dry Tropics Grazing BMP coordinator Lisa Hutchinson, the workshop was designed and delivered by Rural Training Queensland trainer Jean Robins, who is based in Charters Towers.

Capped at 10 participants the course covered Animal Health and Welfare requirements for trucking, castration, dehorning, branding, administering vaccinations, tagging and nutritional requirements for good health.

NQ Dry Tropics Grazing BMP coordinator Lisa Hutchinson said the nationally recognised training provided the participants from seven grazing enterprises a level of security to their business through the formal qualification.

Participants finalise theory assessments before heading to the yards.

Participants finalise theory assessments before heading to the yards.

“Participants travelled from as far as Clermont and Moranbah to attend the workshop and all participants said they enjoyed the balance of theory and practical application,” Ms Hutchinson said.

“It was a natural fit for the Animal Health and Welfare module of the Grazing BMP and with requirements for Livestock Production Assurance (LPA) and Biosecurity Plans being hot topics, it is a good time for people to scrutinise their operations and identify weaknesses.

“Sound husbandry practices addressed at the workshop are in line with national codes of practice that deliver good outcomes in terms of both animal welfare, biosecurity and sustainable farm businesses.

“Proactive graziers give themselves an advantage and this accredited training helps protect their businesses. I will definitely look at holding more of these workshops,” she said.

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