Bowen’s agriculture recognised internationally

Bowen region to host Japanese horticulture students


INTERNATIONAL: Japanese students with an interest in horticulture could travel to Bowen to experience Queensland farming practices.

INTERNATIONAL: Japanese students with an interest in horticulture could travel to Bowen to experience Queensland farming practices.

Aa

Queensland horticulture will be recognised internationally when Tafe Queensland North starts its new agriculture program in 2018.

Aa

Queensland horticulture will be recognised internationally when Tafe Queensland North starts its new agriculture program in 2018.

Bowen will be the face of an international course that will see agriculture students from Japan conduct work experience on Queensland farms.

With an interest in organic farming, students will experience a variety of farming operations around the Bowen region.

Tafe Queensland North general manager, Joann Pyne, said the course would combine both practical and theory elements.

“We are currently having discussions with our Tokyo office about the criteria for the course,” Ms Pyne said.

“The students will have started their tertiary studies and we want to provide them with an incite to the Australian agricultural industry.

“The students seam to have an interest in organic farming as the Japanese are looking into ways where they can increase the yields of crops using organic methods.”

Well known as a food bowl, the Bowen region offers a variety of horticulture and farming expertise.

Tafe Queensland North general manager, Joann Pyne. Photo supplied.

Tafe Queensland North general manager, Joann Pyne. Photo supplied.

Ms Pyne said this made it the perfect location for the course.

“This course will be a great opportunity to demonstrate the quality of what we do, and make people aware of how sophisticated our practices are in Australia.

“Education is Australia’s biggest export earner and we don’t often think that, but this is really good for local economy.

“For students there will be opportunity to do work experience on farms and work alongside Queensland farmers. This will also allow farmers to learn about different techniques used in Japanese practices.”

Tafe Queensland North plan to recruit around 40 to 50 students and once the course is in full flight, potentially open the horticulture training to other parts of Asia.

Ms Pyne did not believe the program would be replicated to other campuses around Queensland.

“We want to make Bowen the focus of this type of training,” she said.

“We would like to offer a several week course and a several month course to cover a variety of students interest levels.

”We are really excited about this program, which is great for Bowen, great for Tafe and hopefully the international students also.”

Aa

From the front page

Sponsored by